donderdag 11 mei 2017

Hackaton: amturingpi goes retro

Introduction.

I've had yet another (48 hours straight) Hackaton, turning my Raspberry PI3 (amturingpi) into a multiple retro computer system, based on the awesome Amibian GNU/Linux distro.

Thanks to the minimalist approach of Amibian it was a quite a easy, exciting and straight forward ride.

I tried turning amturingpi into a multiple retro computer system before, using the RetroPI distro, which miserably failed during the sluggish game controller setup.

Beside that I love emulating my previous 8- and 16-bit computers and it's not necessarily about gaming, yet the computers in general for me.

Amibian.

Amibian is a dramatically minimalist stripped down version of Raspbian, which is the official optimized Debian GNU/Linux spin off for the Raspberry PI computer.

Amibian has only one goal: to turn your Raspberry PI into a classic Commodore-Amiga. Amibian does this very well and efficiently.

I have tried multiple Linux distributions on amtruingpi, yet most of them are too "heavy" for the limited 1 GB RAM and this is where Amibian comes in: no nonsense and overhead. Needles to say I am very excited by this wonderful efficient distro <3
 

OpenMSX.

My first computer was a Philips NMS8220 MSX2 and of course I still love MSX. The only MSX emulator for Linux that I know of is OpenMSX.

I installed it before on Ubuntu MATE for Raspberry PI and figured out that the Catapult frontend GUI doesn't work on the Raspberry PI.
 
Fortunately the OpenMSX developer, known as "VAMPYR" lectured me, OpenMSX has a build in configuration menu: press the menu key (which is in between Alt Gr and right Ctrl on your keyboard).

Thus I installed OpenMSX with:

apt-get install openmsx

And it runs like a charm <3

DOSBOX and more.

I loved MS-DOS and am a huge fan of the FreeDOS project. Thus I tried to install Dosemu, which unfortunately is not available on Raspbian. There for I installed DOSBOX.
 
The problem with DOSBOX is that it requires X11 and a Window manager, there for I installed Xorg and Fluxbox (the most minimalist Window manager that I know of) and fortunately it runs like a charm.

Conclusion.

The Raspberry PI3 makes a great (and cheap) retro computing machine, thanks to the great work of the Amibian team. To get things going requires some (Debian) Linux knowledge and it's a lot of fun.
 
Below a video of my fun project in Dutch.
 
 
 
 

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